History Behind
Frederick Woodwards

Frederick Woodwards Barber Shop pays homage to Woodward & Co, a barber shop that stood in Cathedral Square in 1914.

Woodward & Co proprietor Frederick Woodward was a well known tobacconist in Cathedral Square. Woodward’s held prime position at 207 Colombo Street. It was an important landmark on the north western corner of Colombo Street and Cathedral Square, which had previously been known as "‘Heywood’s corner’.

Woodward’s stood opposite ‘Broadway’s Corner’, on the other side of Colombo Street. This corner was named after a well known refreshment room, confectionery and pasty business operated by brothers. On the other side was the Grand Theatre. Located immediately next to Woodward’s, was Roland Bennett, Watchmaker and Jeweller.

Even though barbers worked long hours and as a whole were not paid well, business was generally good for Frederick Woodward.

Woodward bought the stock-in-trade of Mr J. H. Alston, Hairdresser and Tobacconist, and Frederick immediately went to work at 66 Colombo Street, cutting hair for 6 pence, shaving for 3 pence, and shampooing 6 pence - or all three for 1 shilling. He also cut children’s’ hair for 3 pence - except on Saturday.

Heywood’s Corner, with Woodward & Co standing proudly on the corner, circa 1911.

Heywood’s Corner, with Woodward & Co standing proudly on the corner, circa 1911.

Looking west north west from beside Christ Church Cathedral (foreground, extreme left) in Cathedral Square near the Godley Statue, circa 1918.

Looking west north west from beside Christ Church Cathedral (foreground, extreme left) in Cathedral Square near the Godley Statue, circa 1918.

Woodward & Co. Barber Shop, circa 1914. Proprietor Frederick Woodward and his assistant stand poised at the door, as if to welcome an influx of gentlemen customers.

Woodward & Co. Barber Shop, circa 1914. Proprietor Frederick Woodward and his assistant stand poised at the door, as if to welcome an influx of gentlemen customers.